Giant Little Ones by Keith Behrman Film Review

Among the many gifts bestowed by Cinema, is the ability to witness certain aspects from a point of view that might be foreign or distant from our own.

Giant Little Ones is a film that symbolizes the contrast between how ‘SMALL’ we can feel in the face of other people’s judgment to how ‘GIANT’ we can feel when we just embrace ourselves and truly are being ourselves.

The movie follows the story of Franky Winter and Ballas Kohl who have been best friends since childhood. They are high school royalty: handsome, stars of the swim team, and popular with girls. They live a perfect teenage life – until the night of Franky’s epic 17th birthday party when Franky and Ballas are involved in an unexpected incident that changes their lives forever.

At its broadest sense, the movie really dives into what it means to be a human. Director Keith Behrman crafted an exemplary lesson on homophobia and toxic masculinity in a really elusive and compassionate manner.

Behrman also declared that this movie first and foremost deals, uncomfortably, with the rigid boundaries and very narrow definitions of what it means to be a man, and where sexuality can be experienced and expressed. Almost all sexualities within the film’s premise were left undefined for the sole purpose that human experience is something far greater and more important than a single label or tagline.

The main subjects that this film explores are identity, love and relationships ― how we as individuals relate, and the importance of our relationships with other people, whether it’s family or society at large.

Giant Little Ones also tried to highlight some significant life messages. The one that resonated with me the most is that we don’t need to be afraid of ambiguity around our sexuality and we definitely don’t need to limit our experiences to one label.

The characters were drenched in suffering and inner turbulence especially the lead protagonist whom his storyline I believe developed quite nicely throughout the entire time.

Performance wise, to say the least, all of the performances carry weight. Both Josh Wiggins and Darren Mann delivered heavy and complex acts. Complex just like their characters.

Giant Little Ones, at the end of the day, is not your average coming-of-age kind of story. It’s a honestly a new and daring take on sexuality and humanity that I personally believe everyone should watch!

Franky Winter and Ballas Kohl have been best friends since childhood. They are high school royalty: handsome, stars of the swim team, and popular with girls. They live a perfect teenage life – until the night of Franky’s epic 17th birthday party when Franky and Ballas are involved in an unexpected incident that changes their lives forever.

Initial release: September 9, 2018
Director: Keith Behrman
Screenplay: Keith Behrman
Box office: 166,896 USD
Production companies: Sugar Shack Productions, Scythia Films, Storyboard Entertainment, euclid431 pictures

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